Monday, 13 July 2009

BANG.

As my mate Bill, the Dumnonian, would sling back a few bevies in the Sugar Loaf we’d remark that it was pretty dangerous living in Essex, since that’s where he resided, because it could all go bang in the night.

http://www.sheppey.free-online.co.uk/history/wrecks/monty.html


Now having had my kip interrupted by the IRA setting off some fireworks near Brent Cross, I thought. I mused if the IRA are serious they’d get down to Sheppey and do some serious damage. But no.

Now if I were a real genius psychopath terrorista that planned the take down of the towers I’d reckon Sheppey would be a piece of cake. Bomb in place. Remote control, Badabing!

But NO.

Here’s what an ammunition ship looks like when it goes bang. One of many WW11.





Have you ever wondered why they say they only ever tested one nuclear device in WW11? Yet they dropped two different types of A-bomb. It goes against all engineering priciples. So what do you think might have really happened?

http://gcaptain.com/maritime/blog/worlds-largest-non-nuclear-explosion/

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4176/is_20040521/ai_n14572846/

http://www.seaaustralia.com/documents/The%20Global%20Risk%20of%20Marine%20Pollution%20from%20WWII%20Shipwrecks-final.pdf


“Port Chicago
17 July 1944 the worst home front disaster of WWII occurred when two ships, the E.A. Bryan and the Quinault Victory, docked at Port Chicago, California, exploded one night while African-American sailors were loading ammunition for use in the Pacific theater. Both ships and the loading pier were destroyed, while many of the nearby town's buildings also suffered severe damage. Of the 320 men killed, 202 of them were black enlisted men; the blast also injured 390 men. The worst military loss of life in the continental United States during WWII, this one incident involved 15 percent of all African Americans wounded or killed in this conflict. Despite the extensive casualties, however, sailors were ordered to resume loading on 9 August 1944, with no training or procedural changes to help safeguard against another such catastrophe. Because they were afraid of another explosion, 258 African-American sailors refused to comply with orders. The U.S. Navy court martialed 50 men for mutiny and tried the other 208 on lesser charges. Those convicted of mutiny were sentenced to 15 years in prison, but after the war they were granted amnesty. However, their original convictions were not overturned. Ultimately, though, this incident did result in changes affecting racial relations in the Navy, because ammunition loading ceased to be a "blacks only" assignment. The Navy also adopted safer procedures for loading ammunition.” http://history.sandiego.edu/GEN/filmnotes/negrosoldier2.html

And all of this will lead back to what we now call North Korea.

Go do some work.

Heads up.